Product Review: Tombow Mono Sand Eraser

Hi guys! Happy TGIF!

So today I’ll be reviewing the Mono Sand Eraser by Tombow.  I got this eraser in one of my ArtSnacks boxes, and have been testing it out to see what I think of it.  One of you lovely readers/viewers left a comment on that video warning me that the eraser would damage my paper, and not to try it out on any artworks.  This made me very skeptical of the eraser, so I decided to do a full on experimental study of how well the eraser works.  So here we go!

Here's the eraser up for review today.
Here’s the eraser up for review today.
I was intrigued by the "for typewriter" label on the eraser.  The Tombow website states that this eraser can erase pen and ink, including some marker.
I was intrigued by the “for typewriter” label on the eraser. The Tombow website states that this eraser can erase pen and ink, including some marker.
Here's my setup.  I'm using 96lb textured bristol paper, 96lb smooth bristol, and 140lb cold-pressed watercolour paper for comparisons. Each paper has various lines by pens, copic marker, prismacolor marker, and a strip of graphite hatching for comparison.
Here’s my setup. I’m using 96lb textured bristol paper, 96lb smooth bristol, and 140lb cold-pressed watercolour paper for comparisons. Each paper has various lines by pens, copic marker, prismacolor marker, and a strip of graphite hatching for comparison.
Here's my first results.  The bottom line is one swipe of the eraser.  The top is as many swipes as it took to start to erase the pen lines, about 35.  You can see that some of the prismacolour marker is lightened, but the paper surface on all three papers is damaged to an extent.
Here’s my first results. The bottom line is one swipe of the eraser. The top is as many swipes as it took to start to erase the pen lines, about 35. You can see that some of the prismacolour marker is lightened, but the paper surface on all three papers is damaged to an extent.
I tilted the paper so you can see the damaged texture.
I tilted the paper so you can see the damaged texture.
Next I wanted to test the ability of the eraser to clean up marker outside of lines.  This is copic marker,
Next I wanted to test the ability of the eraser to clean up marker outside of lines. This is copic marker,
Here the results show that the marker is cleaned up to an extent, but the paper has also been damaged.
Here the results show that the marker is cleaned up to an extent, but the paper has also been damaged.
Next I wanted to test out the ability of the eraser to erase pen ink, so I drew a little heart on each paper, with a stray line to erase.
Next I wanted to test out the ability of the eraser to erase pen ink, so I drew a little heart on each paper, with a stray line to erase.
And here's the results.  They all were erased, with varying amounts of damage to the paper.  It took much less strokes to erase then pen than it did the marker.
And here’s the results. They all were erased, with varying amounts of damage to the paper. It took much less strokes to erase then pen than it did the marker.

So there’s my experiments, guys! It seems that the eraser works best on watercolour paper, due to the fact that the paper is most durable and can handle the abrasiveness more than the bristol.  The unfortunate part, however, is that the event of needing the eraser is much more likely to occur on the bristol, because that is the paper usually used with pen and marker.

So would I use this eraser in my own artworks?  Simple answer: no.  Long answer: I wouldn’t want to risk the paper damage.  If I were simply doing some line work that I intended to scan and work further on digitally, it would be an option if I needed to clean up a messy stray line.  One the other hand, however, if I was going to process the image digitally, I could just erase my line mistakes on the computer…which lends the eraser to being more useful in traditional medium…but it damages the paper…so do you see my dilemma?

Final Thoughts

As cool as the eraser sounds, it’s unfortunate that it causes so much damage to paper, otherwise it would be a cool little tool.  As it is, however, I can’t recommend it as a viable option because it just deals too much damage to be really useful in any finished artwork.  This eraser will probably just end up as a decoration on my desk…something nice to look at but not actually use.

Thanks for reading!

-Ashley <3

 

Never miss a new post

Leave a Comment :)